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Posts Tagged '1914'

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the infamous traitor and the 8-hour workday

On January 5th in:

 

1781, Richmond, Virginia, is burned by British naval forces led by Benedict Arnold;

 

1914, The Ford Motor Company announces an eight-hour workday and that it will pay a "living wage" of at least $5 for a day's labor;

 

1919, The German workers' Party, which would become the Nazi Party, is founded;

 

1940, FM radio is demonstrated to the Federal Communications Commission for the first time; and in

 

1972, United States President Richard Nixon order the development of a Space Shuttle program.

 

 

the Santa Fe Trail and the Trans-Alaska Pipeline

 

On November 16 in:

 

1793, French Revolution:  Ninety anti-republican Catholic priests are executed by drowning at Nantes;

 

1822, American Old West:  Missouri trader William Becknell arrives in Santa Fe, New Mexico, over a route that became known as the Santa Fe Trail;

 

1914, the Federal Reserve Bank of the United States officially opens;

 

1938, LSD is first synthesized by Swiss chemist Dr. Albert Hofman at the Sandoz Laboratories in Basel, Switzerland;

 

1940, New York City's "Mad Bomber" George Metesky places his first bomb at a Manhattan office building used by Consolidated Edison;

 

1973, U.S. President Richard Nixon signs the Trans-Alaska Pipeline Authorization Act into law, authorizing the construction of the Alaska Pipeline. 

The first appearances of Saturday Night Live and the steam ferry Juliana

On October 11 in:

 

1811, Inventor John Stevens' boat, the Juliana, begins operation as the first steam-powered ferry (service between New York City, New York and Hoboken, N.J.) 

 

1852, Australia's oldest university, University of Sydney, is inaugurated;

 

1890, In Washington, DC, the Daughters of the American Revolution is founded;

 

1906,  San Francisco public school board sparks a diplomatic crisis between the United States and Japan by ordering Japanese students to be taught in racially segregated schools;

 

1939, JC Penney opens store #1252 in Milford, Delaware, making it a nationwide company with stores in all 48 U.S. states;

 

1950, CBS's mechanical color system is the first to be licensed for broadcast by the U.S. Federal Communications Commission;

 

1975, the NBC sketch comedy/variety show Saturday Night Live debuts, hosted by George Carlin and featuring guests Andy Kaufman, Janis Ian and Billy Preston; and in

 

1986, Ronald Reagan and Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev meet in Reykjavik, Iceland, in an effort to continue discussions about scaling back their intermediate missile arsenals in Europe.

 

 

Opium War and the original Weather Underground

On October 8 in:

 

1645, Jeanne Mance opens the Hotel-Dieu de Montreal, the first lay hospital in North America;

 

1856, the Second Opium War between several western powers and China begins with the Arrow Incident on the Pearl River;

 

1918, In the Argonne Forest in France, United States Corporal Alvin C. York kills 28 German soldiers and captures 132, for which he is awarded the Medal of Honor;

 

1939, Germany annexes Western Poland;

 

1956, the opening rally of the Days of Rage occurs, organized by the Weather Underground in Chicago, Illinois;

 

1991, Croatia votes to sever constitutional relations with Yugoslavia, rendering the country fully independent; and in

 

2001, U.S. President George W. Bush announces the establishment of the Office of Homeland Security. 

The Pope visits the President.

On October 6, in the year:

1723, 17-year-old Benjamin Franklin arrives in Philadelphia;

1876, the American Library Association was founded;

1889, American inventor Thomas Edison shows his first motion picture; and in

1979, Pope John Paul II is the first pontiff to visit the White House. 

1st radio broadcast of the World Series and Versaille March

On October 5 in:

 

1789, Women of Paris march to Versailles in the March on Versailles to confront Louis XVI of France about his refusal to promulgate the decrees on the abolition of feudalism, demand bread, and have the King and his court moved to Paris;

 

1864, 60,000 die when Calcutta is almost totally destroyed by a cyclone;

 

1921, the World Series is broadcast on the radio for the first time;

 

1944, Suffrage is extended to women in France;

 

1947, the first televised Whtie House address is given by U.S. President Harry S. Truman';

 

1962, Dr. No, the first film in the James Bond series, is released;

 

1970, the Public Broadcasting Service (PBS) is founded; and in

 

2001, Barry Bonds surpasses Mark McGwire's single-season home run total with his milestone 71st and 72nd home runs. 

Video Kills the Radio Star and the first Scout camp

On this day in

 

30 BC - Octavian (later known as Augustus) enters Alexandria, Egypt, bringing it under the control of the Roman Republic;

 

1907, The first Scout camp opens on Brownsea Island, the origin of the worlwide Scouting movement;

 

1914, the German Empire declares war on the Russian Empire at the opening of World War I.  The Swiss Army mobilizes because of World War I;

 

1966, Charles Whitman kills 16 people at the University of Texas at Austin before being killed by the police;

 

1981, MTV begins broadcasting in the United States and airs its first video, "Video Killed the Radio Star" by the Buggles; and in

 

1993, the Great Mississippi and Missouri Rivers Flood of 1993 comes to a peak. 

 

 

Video Kills the Radio Star and the first Scout camp

On this day in

 

30 BC - Octavian (later known as Augustus) enters Alexandria, Egypt, bringing it under the control of the Roman Republic;

 

1907, The first Scout camp opens on Brownsea Island, the origin of the worlwide Scouting movement;

 

1914, the German Empire declares war on the Russian Empire at the opening of World War I.  The Swiss Army mobilizes because of World War I;

 

1966, Charles Whitman kills 16 people at the University of Texas at Austin before being killed by the police;

 

1981, MTV begins broadcasting in the United States and airs its first video, "Video Killed the Radio Star" by the Buggles; and in

 

1993, the Great Mississippi and Missouri Rivers Flood of 1993 comes to a peak. 

 

 

Army B-25 and the Kennewick Man is discovered

 

On July 28 in

 

1868, the 14th Amendment to the United States Constitution is certified, establishing African American citizenship and guaranteeing due process of law;

 

1996, the remains of a prehistoric man are discovered near Kennewick, Washington.  These remains will be known as the Kennewick Man;

 

1540, Thomas Cromwell is executed at the order of Henry VIII of England on charges of treason.  Henry marries his fifth wife, Catherine Howard, on the same day;

 

1945, a United States Army B-25 bomber crashes into the 79th floor of the Empire State Building killing 14 and injuring 26, and in

 

2002, nine coalminers trapped in the flooded Quecreek Mine in Somerset County, Pennsylvania, are rescued after 77 hours. 

Joe DiMaggio and a trip to the moon

On July 16 in:

 

1951, The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger is published;

 

1945, Manhattan Project:  The Atomic Age begins when the United States successfully detonates a plutonium-based test nuclear weapon near Alamogordo, New Mexico;

 

1969, Apollo program:  Apollo 11, the first mission to land astronauts on the Moon, is launched from the Kennedy Space Center at Cape Kennedy, Florida;

 

1782, First performance of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart's opera Die Entfuhrung aus dem Serail; 

 

1941, Joe DiMaggio hits safely for the 56the consecutive game, a streak that still stands as a MLB record;

 

1935, the world's first parking meter is installed in Oklahome City, Oklahoma; and in

 

1956, Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus closes its very last "Big Tent" show in Pittsburgh, PA due to changing economics.  All subsequent circus shows will be held in arenas. 

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